How I Got a Programming Job in Los Angeles Bustling Tech Hub

Searching for a job as a software engineer is really painful. There’s a new tech company popping up every minute of the day, and it’s tough to know which one to choose from.

Obviously, I should be grateful for all the opportunities I’m afforded as a software engineer, and I do, but man is this an annoying problem.

The Problem

The software industry is getting a continuous flow of money from VC’s that are just crossing their fingers, hoping that 1/10 of their investments goes IPO or gets acquired.

So that means there’s a lot of cash being invested into all sorts of ideas. Some of these ideas are good, and most of them are crap. Ideally, you want to land at a company where there’s less crap.

Since a lot of these companies are popping up, there are tons of job opportunities. What I’ve found though is that a lot of these companies have hiring managers that simply aren’t prepared to interview software engineers.

These companies don’t know any better, so they use hiring practices that are popular amongst the top tier tech companies like Google and Facebook as a crutch. This makes the job interview process feel really unforgiving for new and existing software engineers alike.

I recently put myself back out there to find a new job. It’s through this long and grueling process that I figured out a few tactics that helped me circumvent many of the common software job search headaches.

Job Search Begins

I kicked off my job search for Senior Android Engineer positions back in June 2018 and started preparing for interviews. You can imagine that I’d have to be quite unhappy at my existing job to have to deal with the aforementioned job search process. Here comes all those fun whiteboard algorithms, yay.

I needed to leave my employer at the time because my goals were no longer lining up with what I was doing. This feeling is something that I’ve learned to pay a lot of attention to. It’s hard to stay excited about anything if you no longer see much value doing it.

My short-term goal at the time was relatively simple: be part of a product-oriented team at a company that focuses on software. Additionally, my long-term goal has been to become a better leader, so I can one day confidently lead teams of my own.

With these goals in mind, it really helped me filter out the job opportunities that were presented to me.

Finding Opportunities

Having been so disappointed with previous job search processes, I desperately looked for a better way to interview with companies. That’s when I came across this very eye-catching ad while I was perusing Quora. It said something like “skip the whiteboard interview”. I was sold.

I am thoroughly convinced that the whiteboard interview has caused more people great pain during their careers as software engineers than helped hiring managers narrow down candidates. It’s one of the most anxiety-inducing and demoralizing interview “strategies” I’ve ever experienced.

Whiteboarding is a topic I could rant about for hours. It was my main motivator for finding a new way to job hunt, and this anti-whiteboard ad I found for a company called Triplebyte, was my holy grail.

I applied for their developer exam immediately. Since I’m an Android developer, I chose their mobile specialty exam and raced through the timed questions. I soon got confirmation that I was good enough to get a follow-up interview, and went from there to schedule it.

The whole process, from initial exam through to their video call screening, and eventually to the onsite interviews was fantastic. I really felt I was getting taken care of. This is how interviewing should be!

That wasn’t the end of my interviewing journey though; it was really just the beginning. Even though Triplebyte set me up with five great companies to interview within San Francisco, they didn’t have the clientele at the time to help me search more local. Since I live in Orange County, I had to find job opportunities out here the more traditional way.

I reached out to everyone in my network that could help me out with this. Previous co-workers, friends, family, and anyone else who could point me to a company with the values I was looking for. I set my LinkedIn profile to “searching for a job”, and tidied up my resume.

I got into contact with a few different interesting companies this way. Some in LA, some in OC, and more — many more — in the Bay Area. I really didn’t want to have to go to the Bay Area.

Besides the obvious factors of the Bay Area — like it’s way too expensive — I knew that moving there would be tough for my wife. It would be much easier to be able to pack everything up and move up there with all the industry elites if I was just a single dude. I had to think about my wife’s family, my family, and the future we’re trying to build together.

That said, I knew that I wanted to get as much interview experience as possible. From previous interview experiences, I anticipated a certain ramp-up time needed to get my mind warmed up for the oncoming onslaught of interviews. The more interviews I got through, the better I felt about the next one.

I ended up narrowing down my search to seven companies: one in LA, one in OC, and the five Triplebyte had arranged for me in the Bay Area. It was time to buckle down, so I took a week off from work and got ready to dive deep into my interviews.

The Interviews

Triplebyte’s process promises that once you are through their initial screening period, you’ll skip ahead to every company’s final interview.

Every company evaluates their software engineers differently. Some throw many hypothetical and theoretical technical problems at their candidates, whilst other companies stick to more practical job-related interview questions.

One thing that really stuck out to me in my round of interviews is just how inconsistently the idea of a “Senior Developer” is defined. Some companies have a list of skills they expect from their “Senior” people, and others just want to see how many hoops you can jump through before getting to the real work.

This made me realize just how fluid job titles are from one business to another. A “Senior” developer at one company could very well be a “Junior” developer at the next one over. Title definitions all come down to the business’ needs, their existing pool of talent, and how desperate they are to hire developers.

Having caught on to this very strange phenomenon, I knew I had to problem-solve my way out of it. So I started explaining to companies what I thought was “Senior” to me. I made sure to highlight my experience leading teams, my abilities outside of programming, and of course proving this all via different code challenges and Q&A.

It actually worked. Of course, the caveat here being that my strategy only worked on companies that I could truly add value to. Meaning that I had to have already been a solid candidate; I just used my “Senior” story to help tip things in my favor.

Out of the seven companies I interviewed with, I received offer letters from five of them. It’s not a bad batting average at all, and I felt rather proud of myself for getting this far.

It wasn’t long after my interviews were over, however, that the final challenge would prove to be most difficult. I had to make a choice as to which company to go to.

Making a Decision

I was staring at a list of five incredibly impressive businesses, with similarly incredible offers. I took a tip I got from one of the recruiters and started on a spreadsheet with all the companies I was considering.

I ended up with a whopping seventeen different categories that I used to compare all of these companies. Let me say that this helped immensely. It gave me a high-level look into all the things that I cared about. Here, I’ll list them out so you can laugh at how thorough this ended up being.

The categories in no particular order: pay, equity, 401(k), relocation bonuses, benefits (like medical), extra perks (like lunch catering, cell phone allowance, etc), vacation policy, company culture, engineering culture, product pros and cons, social impact, audience size, industry, gut feeling, location, commute, and work hours.

The Winner

All things considered, I ended up at my current employer, Weedmaps! I honestly surprised myself at this one too. I’m not a cannabis user, but I was so impressed with everything they were offering that I felt like it was a no-brainer to me.

What really tipped it in Weedmaps’ favor too is that I didn’t have to move. I could stay in beautiful OC, and be close to all my family. I think that’s something that people don’t value enough when considering their next job.

So far though, I’ve been thoroughly pleased with my choice to work at Weedmaps as a Senior Android Engineer. Having been here for just a few months now, I’ve really grown to enjoy working here. I’m so impressed with just how welcoming, and collaborative of an environment Weedmaps is.

It’s the collaboration, the willingness to compromise, and the desire to be better that makes a place like Weedmaps feel like home to me. I think those three traits are what foster growth, and build great teams.

For now, I’m focused on really maxing out the value I can bring to my team at Weedmaps. It’s a place that I feel will grow with me as I continue to push towards my career goals.

Maybe next time I can talk more about those dreaded whiteboard problems. Sigh.

Check these 50 Hottest LA Startups to Work For Right Now

Ryan Simon
Contributor
Ryan Simon is a Senior Android Engineer for Weedmaps. He has taken his background in investing, his degree in business and applied to the world of a software engineer. Ryan spends his free time cooking with his wife or playing Overwatch.
×
Ryan Simon
Ryan Simon is a Senior Android Engineer for Weedmaps. He has taken his background in investing, his degree in business and applied to the world of a software engineer. Ryan spends his free time cooking with his wife or playing Overwatch.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

6 Top Soft Skills You Need To Work At a Startup

6 Top Soft Skills You Need To Work At a Startup

When Google first started, Sergey Brin and Larry Page, set up their hiring algorithms to sift for Computer Science students with top grades from the elite universities. Their belief was that technology can only be truly understood by those who actually studied technology.

They found out much later that this hiring principle wasn’t exactly accurate. In 2013, Google computers tracked all their data concerning their hiring, promoting, and firing of employees. They then found that among the most important qualities of the most successful Google employees, STEM knowledge actually came in last!

The other more important skills are what we call “soft skills”. These are the non-technical attributes that help employees become more productive and better able to work with others.

The soft skills that many startup companies today are looking for include:

Communication Skills

Being able to communicate well is a crucial skill if you want to work well with others. After all, what’s the point of having a good idea if you can’t communicate well enough to convince the other team members about the merits of your idea? If you’re able to communicate well, then you can help convince the rest of the team to believe in your idea. They can understand the idea because you’re able to explain it.

Self-Awareness

This is the ability to recognize how your words and actions affect others. A successful leader needs to develop this mindset because they can then discover how to encourage and motivate others properly. They can also avoid awkward situations when their words and actions hurt and offend their teammates.

Project Management

This means you’re able to organize the work and the team, you can focus on the task at hand, and can work under pressure and time constraints. Even if you’re not the project manager, you can do your part by meeting your deadlines.  You can give updates on your progress and send alerts if you’re having trouble.

Perseverance

You should be able to commit to an assignment until you complete it, even if takes longer than what you anticipated. This also means you need to be flexible, as requirements may change before the due date and you should be able to adapt to the new scope of the project.

Team Mentality

Plenty of people automatically say that they’re a team player, but of course, it isn’t always true. The true team mentality is about getting the work done and helping out one another. But some people seem more focused on getting credit for the success of foisting blame on others when things go wrong.

Willingness and Ability to Learn

Things change all the time, and that’s especially true in the workplace. What employers are looking for are workers who can change with the times and adapt to the new conditions. You can’t be dead-set on using traditional ways when new and more effective tools and processes become available. This means you need to demonstrate your willingness to learn, and that you can and have learned before.

During your job interview, it’s not enough that you demonstrate your technical proficiency for the job. Try to demonstrate these traits in your responses to interview questions, as these are the traits your future employers are looking for.

Also, check out these 5 Things NOT to Say to a Recruiter

Founder, Editor-in-Chief
LAStartups.com, Schmoozd.com
A native Angeleno. John studied engineering at UCLA; founded Schmoozd, an offline social tech networking event in LA with 30,000 subs; ran a startup accelerator (StartEngine). Worked for several major brands like Toyota, DIRECTV, Hitachi, and Raytheon. A mentor at LMU Entrepreneur School. And advises a dozen local LA startups building amazing tech in various industries; also invested in some.
×
LAStartups.com, Schmoozd.com
A native Angeleno. John studied engineering at UCLA; founded Schmoozd, an offline social tech networking event in LA with 30,000 subs; ran a startup accelerator (StartEngine). Worked for several major brands like Toyota, DIRECTV, Hitachi, and Raytheon. A mentor at LMU Entrepreneur School. And advises a dozen local LA startups building amazing tech in various industries; also invested in some.

How to Build a Better Tech Talent Pipeline

How to Build a Better Tech Talent Pipeline

In the tech industry, your brand is only as good as the talented people you have. That’s why you need to make sure you have a strong tech talent pipeline.

If you’re in the tech startup world, then you’re certainly quite aware that competition is growing fierce these days. It’s like there’s a new company cropping up each day. This increasingly crowded space simply emphasizes how you need to have the talent your business requires to get ahead of your competition. But how you can build a strong tech talent pipeline when there’s a lot of demand and the supply isn’t up to par?

A Smaller Talent Pool

This disparity between the great demand for talent and the scarcity of tech people is one of the main challenges to building a better tech talent pipeline. Recent studies indicate that the pool of tech talent from which the industry can draw may dry up by the year 2030.

Not that this is surprising news. Surveys reveal that almost two-thirds (65%) of CIOs foresee that this scarcity of talent will cripple the industry in the future.

It’s even happening now. Companies are increasingly becoming dependent on new technology to generate value for their products and services, but they have not invested in the needed human capital to keep the tech coming.

As a result, these companies reap what they sow. Up to 86% of companies are having difficulties finding and enlisting the tech talent they require. Almost as many companies feel that the tech talent they have is insufficient, leading to delayed development and missed revenues. The talents they have in turn are overly stressed and more of them feel burned out.

Overcoming the Challenges

So what can you do in light of these problems? Here are some suggestions:

  • Make your company more attractive to potential hires. That means offering competitive salaries and benefits. You also need to customize your approach so that you can hire specific points about your company that will attract a particular potential employee. You have to consider what their goals are, and figure out how your company can help them achieve those goals.
  • What’s more, you need a healthy company culture that actually entices people to stay. Some companies are so enjoyable for workers that they refuse higher bids for their services, knowing that other companies may have a worse working environment.
  • Enhance the training for your current workforce. If you can’t find the trained talents for your needs, you may find them among your current employees. Or you can find the workers with the right potential and then offer to cover their training. You can then support them when they learn new technologies and new coding languages.
  • Invest in high school students. Identify which students have the smarts and the character that best suit your needs, and then help them out. Perhaps you can offer to pay for some training, or even offer a partial scholarship. At the very least, the relationship you forge will then make your company first in line as prospective companies to work for when they graduate from college.

Admittedly, these measures don’t hide the fact that a dwindling talent pool is a serious problem for the tech industry. But by considering our suggestions, you can do better than your competition in dealing with this issue.

Founder, Editor-in-Chief
LAStartups.com, Schmoozd.com
A native Angeleno. John studied engineering at UCLA; founded Schmoozd, an offline social tech networking event in LA with 30,000 subs; ran a startup accelerator (StartEngine). Worked for several major brands like Toyota, DIRECTV, Hitachi, and Raytheon. A mentor at LMU Entrepreneur School. And advises a dozen local LA startups building amazing tech in various industries; also invested in some.
×
LAStartups.com, Schmoozd.com
A native Angeleno. John studied engineering at UCLA; founded Schmoozd, an offline social tech networking event in LA with 30,000 subs; ran a startup accelerator (StartEngine). Worked for several major brands like Toyota, DIRECTV, Hitachi, and Raytheon. A mentor at LMU Entrepreneur School. And advises a dozen local LA startups building amazing tech in various industries; also invested in some.

ObEN is Hiring 37 Resources in Pasadena

Pasadena-based AI tech company ObEN is hiring 37 talent to join its team.  You’ll be working in small, agile teams (alongside world-class researchers in areas of speech, computer vision, machine learning, NLP, and blockchain).

Founded in 2014, ObEN is a Softbank Ventures Korea and HTC Vive X portfolio company and is located inside of Bill Gross think tank, Idealab. ObEN creates virtual identities for consumers and celebrities in the emerging digital world. ObEN provides Personal AI that simulates a person’s voice, face and personality, enabling never before possible social and virtual interactions.

Engineering Jobs

  1. Blockchain Engineer
    • Design and build the back-end blockchain functionality for ObEN’s online/mobile applications
  2. Full Stack Engineer
    • Design and build new applications, features, functionality, writing APIs, scalability, and maintainability improvements for ObEN’s innovative platforms
  3. Javascript Developer
    • Design and build new applications, features, functionality, scalability, and maintainability improvements for the WeChat mini program platform
  4. Lead DevOps Engineer
    • You’ll join a high-growth, agile engineering team focused on bringing cutting-edge Artificial Intelligence products to market
    • Working in a fault-tolerant, highly-scalable/available, high-traffic environment
  5. Sr. Full Stack Engineer
    • Responsible for building and extending our APIs (VR/AR/AI) and services for ObEN’s native iOS/Android applications and mobile/desktop web applications
  6. Sr. IOS Developer
    • Responsible for the development and maintenance of applications aimed at a range of iOS devices including mobile phones and tablets
  7. Sr. QA Engineer
    • Responsible to create and implement quality best practices processes and maintain test automation frameworks, and develop tools to ensure ObEN deliver an optimal end-user experience product
  8. Sr. Unity Developer
    • Responsible for the development and maintenance of mobile, browser and pc-based applications (VR/AR/AI) and their integration with back-end services

Machine Learning Jobs

  1. Deep Learning Scientist
    • Design, develop, configure and optimize deep neural networks for various tasks such as detection and classification
    • PhD, M.Sc. in Computer Science, Electrical Engineering or Econometrics
  2. Machine Learning Engineer
    • Implementing ML models proposed and guided by ML Research Scientists and collaborating with other team members for data collection and pre-processing, and post-processing of data
    • MS in Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Physics, or other related fields
  3. Machine Learning Research Director
    • Responsible for supervising research scientists and engineers, providing feedback for projects using ML, including those in other teams, developing and shaping ML projects with respect to the company’s needs, and managing the ML team
    • PhD in Computer Science, Statistics, Electrical Engineering, Applied Mathematics, or related field
  4. Machine Learning Research Scientist
    • Developing novel ML models for projects in the company, like a new TTS model, implementing and improving proposed/existing ML models, and supervising and providing feedback to ML engineers for projects using ML, including those in other teams.
    • PhD in Computer Science, Statistics, Electrical Engineering, Applied Mathematics, or related field
  5. Machine Learning Scientist With Audio DSP Background
    • Provide technical expertise and execution know-how to the design of machine learning algorithms/solutions to solve ultra-challenging problems
    • Doctorate (Preferred) or Masters degree in Computer Science, Mathematics, Applied Physics, Applied Statistics or in Engineering
  6. ML Engineer for NLP in Chinese
    • Create the best Machine Translation solutions for ObEN’s algorithms in Chinese
    • Proficiency in Java/Android, Objective C/iOS, javascript, C#/Unity3D
    • Fluent in Mandarin Chinese and English
  7. ML Engineer for NLP in English
    • Create the best Machine Translation solutions for ObEN’s algorithms in English
    • M.Sc. in Computer Science, Electrical Engineering or Physics, High proficiency in C++
  8. ML Engineer for NLP In Japanese
    • Create the best Machine Translation solutions for ObEN’s algorithms in English
    • Experience with data-driven statistical or machine learning methods.
    • Fluent in Japanese and English
  9. ML Engineer for NLP In Korean
    • Create the best Machine Translation solutions for ObEN’s algorithms in English
    • M.Sc. in Computer Science, Electrical Engineering or Physics, High proficiency in C++
    • Fluent in Korean and English

Computer Vision, Art, NLP Jobs

  1. Computer Vision Research Engineer
    • Develop impactful and innovative computer vision technologies; Work closely with research scientists to deeply understand the developed research prototypes and transform them into production
  2. Computer Vision Research Scientist
    • Literature review and discussion with peer researchers to define clear research problems and propose novel solutions
  3. Senior Rigging Artist (Contractor)
    • Creating and developing fast elegant character rigs using Maya and proprietary tools. Working with modeling and animation departments to facilitate articulate realistic appealing characters.
  4. Chatbot Engineer
    • Build, improve and extend chatbot capabilities for ObEN’s Full Stack Personal AI. Produce deliverable results and take them from development to production in collaboration with our engineers
  5. Natural Language Processing Engineer
    • Build, improve and extend NLP capabilities for ObEN’s Full Stack AI. Research and evaluate new/different approaches to NLP problems
  6. Research Scientist (NLP)
    • Conduct research to advance the state-of-the-art technology in NLP and deep learning, like dialogue systems

Speech Jobs

  1. Research Linguist (Japanese)
    • Design schemas and label/tag sets to annotate recordings and text with phonetic, prosodic, semantic, and syntactic features
  2. Speech Research Scientist (ASR)
    • Develop and extend ObEN’s proprietary ASR systems for different languages (English, Chinese, Korean, Japanese), in view of improving the robustness against environmental and channel distortion
  3. Speech Research Scientist (Prosody Modeling)
    • Develop a new prosody models for different languages (Chinese, English, Japanese, Korean) to improve the naturalness and the similarity of the synthesized voice and to allow better control of its expressivity
  4. Speech Research Scientist (Singing Voice Synthesis)
    • Develop and improve ObEN’s virtual singing voice technology based on a novel voice model with improved glottal source modelingl
  5. Speech Research Scientist (Speech Synthesis)
    • Develop and extend ObEN’s glottal source model, in view of improving the quality, flexibility and control (e.g. voice quality, expressivity) of ObEN’s speech and singing voice synthesis system
  6. Speech Research Scientist (Text-to-Speech)
    • Develop and extend ObEN’s proprietary TTS system, in view of improving the quality and the naturalness of the synthesized voice as well as the similarity to the target voice and reducing the amount of data for speaker adaptation

Marketing, Product Jobs

  1. Community Manager (Korean Market)
    • Help build and grow a strong community in ObEN’s Korean market; someone who is passionate about advanced technology and possess superior communication skills
  2. Director of Marketing (AI & Blockchain)
    • Lead ObEN’s global marketing efforts. Develop, plan, and budget marketing initiatives that will drive the company’s strategic growth and community expansion across key verticals and operating regions
  3. Enterprise Product Manager
    • Lead product ideation, technical development, product testing, and product launch processes for ObEN’s products
  4. Marketing Associate (Blockchain)
    • Develop content for various internal and external communications, including blogs, social, and community engagement
  5. Marketing Associate (Japanese)
    • Develop content for various internal and external communications – Staying current with tech industry news and trends, especially for the Japanese community
  6. Marketing Associate (Korean)
    • Develop content for various internal and external communications – Staying current with tech industry news and trends, especially for the Korean community
  7. Product Designer
    • Create UX designs, including wireframes, storyboard, and prototypes during ideation and development phases.
    • Establish best practices and methodologies on how designs are documented and communicated
  8. Senior Product Manager
    • Lead the ideation, planning, technical development, product analytics, and launch of innovative Personal AI-based products

Benefits + Perks

  • Lunch, Dinner, Snacks & Bagel Mondays
  • Weekly Chair Massages and Yoga – NICE!
  • Medical, Dental, Vision, 401K Plans
  • Open Vacation Policy
  • Company Happy Hours, Hikes & Retreats
  • Competitive Salary and Generous Stock Options

 

 

 

Founder, Editor-in-Chief
LAStartups.com, Schmoozd.com
A native Angeleno. John studied engineering at UCLA; founded Schmoozd, an offline social tech networking event in LA with 30,000 subs; ran a startup accelerator (StartEngine). Worked for several major brands like Toyota, DIRECTV, Hitachi, and Raytheon. A mentor at LMU Entrepreneur School. And advises a dozen local LA startups building amazing tech in various industries; also invested in some.
×
LAStartups.com, Schmoozd.com
A native Angeleno. John studied engineering at UCLA; founded Schmoozd, an offline social tech networking event in LA with 30,000 subs; ran a startup accelerator (StartEngine). Worked for several major brands like Toyota, DIRECTV, Hitachi, and Raytheon. A mentor at LMU Entrepreneur School. And advises a dozen local LA startups building amazing tech in various industries; also invested in some.

CrowdStrike is Hiring 34 Remote Engineers

CrowdStrike is a cybersecurity technology company developing next-generation endpoint protection, delivered as a single integrated cloud-based solution. CrowdStrike’s Falcon technology stops breaches by detecting all attacks types, even malware-free intrusions, providing five-second visibility across all current and past endpoint activity while reducing cost and complexity for customers.

They are seeking 34 top-notch remote engineers to continue expanding its’ technology to stop security breaches around the globe.

Remote Engineering Jobs

  1. Application Security Engineer I
    • Help ensure software and systems are designed and implemented to the highest security standards. Develop threat models and test plans for new and existing platform components
  2. Engineering Program Manager
    • Creating and driving the project schedule, working with dev management task assignments, and managing schedule progress; from large phases through to detailed tasks, including understanding and managing dependencies
  3. Engineering Program Manager – East Coast
    • Collaborating with staff and management of multiple worldwide business units (including subject matter experts, design teams, and technology teams) to clearly identify, explain, and communicate their project involvement, project goals, expectations, and tasks.
  4. Senior Infrastructure Engineer
    • Help take our internal automation to the next level. Looking for a highly-technical, hands-on engineer with experience using several open source projects commonly found in large-scale deployments.
  5. Senior Infrastructure Engineer – Dev
    • Building and deploying self-service APIs and automation around large-scale cloud-based critical systems. You will be responsible for maintaining and extending the capabilities of internal administrative web components and developing infrastructure services to support CrowdStrike’s goal of a full DevOps model.
  6. Senior Network Engineer
    • Plan data center builds for agile use and deployment. Product periodic status reports on data center progress and performance and costs.
  7. Senior Security Engineer – Systems
    • Perform technical security assessments of current and new systems, monitor for emerging vulnerabilities, create tooling for known gaps, and deploy large-scale security/monitoring systems.
  8. Senior Software Engineer
    • Work closely with product management and development team to understand requirements and technical specifications. Create test plans, test cases, and automation for new features and enhancements to existing features.
  9. Senior Systems Engineer – Data Services
    • Maintain a deep understanding of the data components – including Cassandra, ElasticSearch, Kafka, Zookeeper, Hadoop, and Spark, and use that understanding to operate and automate properly configured clusters.
  10. Senior UX Writer
    • Write thoughtful, helpful UX microcopy: headings, labels, calls to actions, errors.Define the problem space, discover what the customer needs to know, and help customers complete tasks, based on research, interviews with subject matter experts, and using the product.
  11. Site Reliability Engineer
    • Develop and maintain services to meet reliability and scalability demands. Develop and enhancement monitoring services.
  12. Software Development Engineer in Test
    • Verify component, system integration, and application level features, and functionality to ensure our reliability, accuracy, and performance reach our standards for quality.
  13. Software Development Engineer in Test
    • Review engineering technical design documents and requirements. Provide plan and strategy about how and where to build in testability
  14. Software Development Engineer in Test – Sensor
    • Analyze complex software features, and build effective test strategies and test design. Build useful tools, frameworks, and test setup to use for developing tests effectively; the goal is to minimize manual testing and for the team to write automated tests for the product.
  15. Software Tools Engineer – Linux
    • Support and improve our tools for continuous build and release management. Build and maintain tools to improve scale and efficiency in our product and product release process.
  16. Splunk Engineer
    • Lead backend engineering efforts from rapid prototypes to large-scale applications using Splunk, Python, and Javascript.
  17. Sr. Cloud Engineer
    • Lead backend engineering efforts from rapid prototypes to large-scale applications across CrowdStrike products. Brainstorm, define and build collaboratively with members across multiple teams.
  18. Sr. Data Engineer – Cloud
    • Work on and develop new customer-facing data products as well as internal analytics systems which will be used by teams including Data Science and Validation.
  19. Sr. Software Engineer
    • Lead backend engineering efforts from rapid prototypes to large-scale applications across CrowdStrike products.
  20. Sr. Software Engineer – Golang
    • Leverage and build cloud-based systems to detect targeted attacks and automate cyber threat intelligence production at a global scale.
  21. Sr. Software Engineer – Sensor
    • Provide key leadership on the sensor development team involved in architecture, strategy, in building and improving next-generation Anti-Virus and Enhanced Detection and Response Security Software.
  22. Sr. Software Engineer – Sensor Backend
    • Provide key contribution to the sensor development team involved in architecture, in implementation, and improvements to next generation Anti-Virus and Enhanced Detection and Response Security Software.
  23. Sr. Software Engineer – Overwatch Labs
    • Lead projects to build new components and extend the current system, where you would need to gather requirements, plan, code, test, and deploy to completion. Help the OverWatch team become more effective in their analysis and hunting by improving the platform and tools.
  24. Systems Engineer – Automation
    • Automation of large scale systems spanning multiple locations and environments. Write code that understands public cloud, private cloud, bare metal. Automate common tasks, deploy with an IaaS model, utilize chef or similar.
  25. Senior Intelligence Analyst, eCrime
    • Identify cyber threats, trends, and new developments on various predetermined cybersecurity topics by analyzing raw intelligence and data which includes geopolitical and transnational events/issues
  26. Security Engineer
    • Plan security systems by evaluating network and security technologies; developing requirements for local area networks (LANs), wide area networks (WANs), virtual private networks (VPNs), routers, firewalls, and related security and network devices
  27. Platform Operations Specialist
    • Providing technical implementation, configuration, and troubleshooting assistance with the deployment of the CrowdStrike platform and associated applications. Troubleshoot customer deployment issues across small to large enterprises
  28. Security DevOps Engineer
    • Develop code (Python, Powershell, Javascript, HTML, etc) to interact with REST APIs and API driven security technologies to automate security tasks. Programming/Scripting: experience coding in Powershell, C, C#, VB, Python, Perl, Ruby on Rails, and.NET.
  29. Software Engineer – Services Cloud Infrastructure
    • Develop production, scalable, secure, and customer-facing tools. Write clean, documented, and maintainable code
  30. Sr. Curriculum Developer
    • Create, extend, enhance, revise and maintain course material on incident response, forensic analysis, intelligence operations, and other information security topics.
  31. Sr. Data Engineer
    • Good knowledge of some (or all) of AWS, Python, Golang , Kafka , Spark, Airflow, ECS, Kubernetes, etc to build infrastructure that can ingest and analyze billions of events per day.
  32. Sr. Developer, Research Operations II
    • Collaborate with SCAR members to build, develop, and maintain operational research systems, projects, and tools. Lead projects to build new components and extend the current system, where you would need to gather requirements, plan, code, test, and deploy to completion.
  33. Escalation Engineer – Mac
    • Expertise in the macOS environment troubleshooting and diagnosing low-level operating systems and network issues. Ability to develop diagnostic scripts and other customer-facing automation to help gather more targeted information relevant to failures.
  34. Technical Account Manager
    • Serve as primary technical contact and augment our customer support teams. Serve as a customer advocate with internal CrowdStrike stakeholders to ensure needed customer feedback is adequately documented and assessed by internal parties.

Benefits + Perks

  • Competitive compensation + Stock Options
  • 401k
  • Competitive Vacation Policy
  • Paid parental leave
  • Competitive Health, dental, and vision benefits for you and your family
  • We embrace distributed work and flexible work hours
  • Wellness programs
  • Stocked fridges, coffee, soda, and lots of treats
  • Free lunches regularly catered
  • Regular team activities, including happy hours, community service events

 

 

 

Founder, Editor-in-Chief
LAStartups.com, Schmoozd.com
A native Angeleno. John studied engineering at UCLA; founded Schmoozd, an offline social tech networking event in LA with 30,000 subs; ran a startup accelerator (StartEngine). Worked for several major brands like Toyota, DIRECTV, Hitachi, and Raytheon. A mentor at LMU Entrepreneur School. And advises a dozen local LA startups building amazing tech in various industries; also invested in some.
×
LAStartups.com, Schmoozd.com
A native Angeleno. John studied engineering at UCLA; founded Schmoozd, an offline social tech networking event in LA with 30,000 subs; ran a startup accelerator (StartEngine). Worked for several major brands like Toyota, DIRECTV, Hitachi, and Raytheon. A mentor at LMU Entrepreneur School. And advises a dozen local LA startups building amazing tech in various industries; also invested in some.

4 Secrets to Retaining Your Tech Talent

4 Secrets to Retaining Your Tech Talent

The supply of tech talent is dwindling, so how can you entice your current tech workers to stay? We have some tips to help you convince your workers to remain.

Many smaller tech companies these days feel like they’re the Kansas City Royals when they have great shortstops and pitchers. Once the Yankees and the Red Sox come calling, these small market teams have to no choice but to say goodbye to their superstars.

Is it then inevitable that you’ll lose your tech workers when headhunters dangle more lucrative salaries for these wizards? Not necessarily. There are ways for you to foster the kind of work environment that makes people want to stay. To achieve that type of work environment, here’s what you need to do if you’re the boss:

1. Remember the Human Element

Sometimes we just think of our employees by their job titles and what they can do for the company. But they’re not just chess pieces we move around the board. These are people, with human emotions and beliefs. You can’t forget that.

That’s why you need to learn how to emphasize and listen to your employees. One way to improve your skills in these aspects is to take coaching courses and read coaching materials. You’re more like a coach of a sports team rather than a chess player with unfeeling game pieces.

2. Have a Clear Vision and Mission

It’s not just money that drives people. Sometimes it’s as simple as wanting to succeed, especially when the purpose is something they wholeheartedly believe in. To help your employees get on the bandwagon, you have to make it clear what your company’s vision is regarding its purpose. Workers are then more apt to be motivated to work for a noble purpose, and they’ll be more engaged.

Disengagement is a huge problem with workers, as this state makes them more likely to leave and find something more engaging. That’s why you need to set clear goals. Your workers need to know that what they’re doing is actually important.

3. Help Your Talent Become Better Leaders

You should have processes that support team leaders, especially those who have been thrust into leadership positions for the first time. Helping them to succeed helps your company in many ways, as you improve the productivity of those teams. In addition, you give your new team leaders a sense of belonging in your company, as they have a greater influence on the success of your business. Once they believe that your company is also in a way “their baby”, they’re less likely to abandon their position for a new company.

4. Offer Recognition

It’s no secret that the majority of employees tend to work harder when they’re recognized for their efforts. They’re disheartened when their efforts are seemingly ignored, which tempts them to leave for other companies where their efforts may be more appreciated. You don’t need to give them lavish prizes—just offer the recognition in a timely manner and make it personal. Make sure it’s sincere, and not just something that seems forced.

Remember, people aren’t always motivated by money. People can love their jobs not just because of the money, and if they love their job while they work for you they’re less likely to leave.

Founder, Editor-in-Chief
LAStartups.com, Schmoozd.com
A native Angeleno. John studied engineering at UCLA; founded Schmoozd, an offline social tech networking event in LA with 30,000 subs; ran a startup accelerator (StartEngine). Worked for several major brands like Toyota, DIRECTV, Hitachi, and Raytheon. A mentor at LMU Entrepreneur School. And advises a dozen local LA startups building amazing tech in various industries; also invested in some.
×
LAStartups.com, Schmoozd.com
A native Angeleno. John studied engineering at UCLA; founded Schmoozd, an offline social tech networking event in LA with 30,000 subs; ran a startup accelerator (StartEngine). Worked for several major brands like Toyota, DIRECTV, Hitachi, and Raytheon. A mentor at LMU Entrepreneur School. And advises a dozen local LA startups building amazing tech in various industries; also invested in some.

Fear Of Missing Out?

Get our Newsletter Today!  

We'll let you know who's hiring (shhh), great deals on tools and services, upcoming events, which startup got funded, which investor to connect ...  
SUBSCRIBE
close-link