Top 10 Best Kept Secrets of the Régime des Fleurs Cult Perfume Brand

Top 10 Best Kept Secrets of the Régime des Fleurs Cult Perfume Brand

What is a cult brand? A cult brand is a brand that may not be very well known in general circles, but it inspires a devoted customer base. Such is the case with Régime des Fleurs, which is so low key that very few people know about it. Those who do know about, however, include some of the most knowledgeable experts in the fashion industry as well as the most fanatical artistic types in the niche of fragrances.

So let’s shed a spotlight into one of the most secrets yet sought-after brands in scents:

  1. Régime des Fleurs was actually founded in 2014. But they operated only in cyberspace, with cofounders Alia Raza and Ezra Woods communicating with customers only through their computers and through Instagram.
  2. For the most part, they relied on Internet word of mouth to spread the word of their perfumes. That meant they had to produce something that people would actually want to talk about, and they succeeded without a doubt. They used seductive notes like Earl Grey vapor and white ambergris to separate themselves from the rest of the crowd. Their fragrances were also blended by hand, which gave them an artisanal quality.
  3. Even their bottles were designed to catch attention. These were all custom-painted. They used unusual hues and shades, including lustrous peacock colors and luminous orange. These bottles also sported a small gold crest with the brand’s initials, and it looked supremely regal.
  4. The founders operated Régime des Fleurs for nearly 4 years in this way. They only recently opened a storefront atelier in LA, and they did so quietly without any bombastic fanfare.
  5. The location of their storefront was carefully chosen, as it was in Mid-City. It was right there in the middle of a neighborhood which has gradually been transformed by the arrival of various spaces dedicated to fashion and art.
  6. Right in front of the atelier, Régime des Fleurs offers its full lineup of products, with also includes formerly limited edition collaborations. These eclectic items include vinyl records from a project with Chloë Sevigny and Michel Gaubert along with candles hand-painted by noted textile artist George Venson of Voutsa.
  7. The Fait Main line is in the production area behind a white curtain, and this is the original collection of esoteric fragrances. This area also acts as the shipping hub for the online business.
  8. Customers have encouraged Alia Raza and Ezra Woods to run the place like an art gallery. Régime des Fleurs has a deep connection with its devoted fan base, and so they have catered to their customers’ preferences. They’ve featured dreamlike stylized oil paintings and artworks cast in lead crystal and blown glass. Featured artists include Max Jansons, Dylan Palmer, Samantha Thomas, and Kathy Klein.
  9. In a recent opening party, Kathy Klein set up psychedelic designs with flower petals on the floor.
  10. Out back, the flowers continue to emphasize the brand’s connection with botanical nature, with a parking lot filled with gorgeous flowering vines like passionflowers, morning glories, jasmine, and bougainvillea.

Get them here: 3305 W Washington Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90018

Author Details
Santa Monica, Culver City, Venice, Hollywood, and beyond
LAStartups.com is a digital lifestyle publication that covers the culture of startups and technology companies in Los Angeles. It is the go-to site for people who want to keep up with what matters in Los Angeles’ tech and startups from those who know the city best.
×
Santa Monica, Culver City, Venice, Hollywood, and beyond
LAStartups.com is a digital lifestyle publication that covers the culture of startups and technology companies in Los Angeles. It is the go-to site for people who want to keep up with what matters in Los Angeles’ tech and startups from those who know the city best.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

8 Best Places to Visit for LA Vintage Shopping

8 Best Places to Visit for LA Vintage Shopping

It’s no secret that you can satisfy your craving for vintage fashion if you’re in LA. But where exactly do you go? While there’s no shortage of shops that offer vintage wares, here are the places you should visit first:

1. Scout

If you’ve got the budget for high-end vintage fashion, then Scout has the goods you’re looking for. Scout is the ultimate trendsetter, as its pieces influence the influencers in fashion.

Location: 8021 Melrose Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90046

2. Rose Bowl Flea Market

You need to be in LA at the right time to enjoy the Rose Bowl Flea Market. But if you can find a way to be at the Rose Bowl Stadium on the second Sunday of the month, then you’re in for a treat. You can visit the best flea market in the entire west coast with more than 2,500 vendors offering you vintage treats for a bargain.

Location: 1001 Rose Bowl Dr, Pasadena, CA 91103

3. Melrose Trading Post

On any given Sunday, you can visit the Melrose Trading Post for unbelievable flea market bargains. Here you can find vintage clothes and antique jewelry and furniture from up to 200 vendors every week.

Location: 7850 Melrose Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90046

4. FIDM Museum

While you can’t actually buy everything you see here, this place will give you an idea of just what kind of vintage clothes are available here in the epicenter of cinema. This museum is located on the ground floor of the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising’s downtown LA campus.

Location: 919 S Grand Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90015

5. Paper Moon Vintage

You know a place is into vintage when its motto is “the older the better”. Here, the places are so vintage that pieces from the 1960s are unavailable—they’re too new to be considered! But if you’re looking for some 1920s flapper pizzazz or an outfit to match your Victorian tastes, here’s the place to visit.

Location: 4516 Hollywood Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90027

6. Tavin

This is where you head on out to if you’re looking for the 1960s and 70s fashion, but it’s also a place where Victorian threads are available as well. This is the hub of gypsy fashion in LA. It’s a surreal and dreamy shop, but you can lose yourself in the dream very easily here.

Location: 1543 Echo Park Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90026

7. Foxhole

What if you’re really into vintage denim? If that’s the case, then it’s a cardinal sin for you to overlook the Foxhole. Here, they really “dream in denim” as denim goes well beyond jeans and jackets. You can find vintage denim ponchos, purses, and even pillows. Try out their vintage denim jackets first, as they’re the first rate. The owners of the place can even stitch your initials on your items if you ask nicely.

Location: 3318 Sunset Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90026

8. Avalon Vintage

The collection is quite diverse, coming from periods ranging from the turn of the century 1900s to the alternative grunge of the 1990s. whether you’re looking for sweaters from the 1980s or trying for silk jammies from the 1930s, you’ll get your fill of vintage style. In fact, even old music is available here with more than 6,000 records from bygone years.

Location: 106 N Ave 56, Los Angeles, CA 90042

These places just scratch the surface of the LA vintage shopping scene. What’s more, new places open constantly so don’t forget to visit LA regularly to satisfy your urge for vintage!

Author Details
Editor-In-Chief
A native Angeleno. John studied engineering at UCLA; founded Schmoozd, an offline social tech networking event in LA with 30,000 subs; ran a startup accelerator (StartEngine). Worked for several major brands like Toyota, DIRECTV, Hitachi, and Raytheon. A mentor at LMU Entrepreneur School. And advises a dozen local LA startups building amazing tech in various industries; also invested in some.

john@lastartups.com
×
Editor-In-Chief
A native Angeleno. John studied engineering at UCLA; founded Schmoozd, an offline social tech networking event in LA with 30,000 subs; ran a startup accelerator (StartEngine). Worked for several major brands like Toyota, DIRECTV, Hitachi, and Raytheon. A mentor at LMU Entrepreneur School. And advises a dozen local LA startups building amazing tech in various industries; also invested in some.

john@lastartups.com

The Best Hiking Trails to the Iconic Hollywood Sign

The Best Hiking Trails to the Iconic Hollywood Sign

NYC may have its Statue of Liberty, but in LA there’s no need for a huge and fancy statue to symbolize the city. It’s a HOLLYWOOD sign right up there on the side of the mountain. It’s a sight that’s one of the most recognizable landmarks in the world, and invariably every movie and TV show displays the sign to immediately tell people where the action is.

While it seems like a great view from below, you know what’s better? It’s if you can hike up to it so that you can take a selfie with that huge sign as your immediate background. There’s an easy way to get there, and there’s another hiking trail you can use if you want more of a challenge.

The Easy Trail

If you want to take things easy, it’s understandable. All you need to do is to take the Mount Hollywood trail to take you right to the sign. You start in Griffith Park, with 2 possible starting points in the area.

The starting point for the shorter trail starts at the parking lot of the Griffith Observatory. This hike is about 3 miles long, which is like a stroll in the park for most hikers. For newbies, it’s not all that bad either.

The other starting point is on a fire road intersecting N. Vermont Canyon Road. It’s only a little bit longer. You can find parking at both spots, but you may have to compete with other hikers especially if you come later in the day. You should come in early in the morning so parking is easier, plus you can enjoy a cooler hike.

The Charlie Turner Trailhead also has another starting point for the Mt. Hollywood trail. You can’t miss it, as you’ll see various signs that should point you the right direction.

Just remember, this is the easy trail with different starting points. It’ll be a little over 3 miles, and it should take you about 2 hours to hike. It’ll take you right next to the sign.

Hollywood Hiking Trail in Los Angeles

The Challenging Trail

If you’re really fit and itching to prove it, then this is the trail for you. This is the Canyon Drive trail, and you’ll end up behind the sign with this hike. What’s more, you get to see the awesome view of downtown LA as well as the San Fernando Valley.

It’s about 6½ miles long and you’ll need about 4 hours to complete the journey. Keep in mind that you’ll hike going up by about 1100 feet, so be prepared. Take lots of water with you, and make sure you have sunscreen.

Plenty of people start this trail at the wee hours of the morning. This gives you a cooler hike and at the end, the sunlight gives you a great view. But you may also want to try it at sunset too. The view is a lot more unique, and you get enchanting hues with your views of downtown LA and the San Fernando Valley.

Author Details
Editor-In-Chief
A native Angeleno. John studied engineering at UCLA; founded Schmoozd, an offline social tech networking event in LA with 30,000 subs; ran a startup accelerator (StartEngine). Worked for several major brands like Toyota, DIRECTV, Hitachi, and Raytheon. A mentor at LMU Entrepreneur School. And advises a dozen local LA startups building amazing tech in various industries; also invested in some.

john@lastartups.com
×
Editor-In-Chief
A native Angeleno. John studied engineering at UCLA; founded Schmoozd, an offline social tech networking event in LA with 30,000 subs; ran a startup accelerator (StartEngine). Worked for several major brands like Toyota, DIRECTV, Hitachi, and Raytheon. A mentor at LMU Entrepreneur School. And advises a dozen local LA startups building amazing tech in various industries; also invested in some.

john@lastartups.com

Day of the Dead Playing Cards Made in LA by Local Artist Steve Minty

Day of the Dead Playing Cards Made in LA by Local Artist Steve Minty

The Day of the Dead, or Dia de Muertos in Spanish, is a widely celebrated holiday in Mexico and the United States. The holiday actually spans several days when family and friends gather to remember and pray for their deceased loved ones. Most people also visit the graves of their loved ones, and light candles and place flowers on them, as well as enjoy a picnic with their family.

In modern times, it’s celebrated from October 31 to November 2.

The Day of the Dead is the inspiration behind the Muertos Playing Cards. Steve Minty designed the deck of cards while the United States Playing Card Company (USPCC) manufactured them.

Every card is designed with the theme of celebrating life and death in the tradition of Dia de Muertos. The history of the Day of the Dead tradition in particular and Mexican culture, in general, is reflected in the design, while the social classes present in the past are also depicted. The deck has a contemporary feel complemented by an elegant look with its gold-on-black design.

Each deck comes with 54 custom playing cards and two gaff cards. The characters and numbers are printed with gold ink on a black background, a combination that makes them pop out. The deck is packaged in a gold foil and embossed tuck box, too, for added luxury.  

Steve Minty drew inspiration for his designs from the message of the Day of the Dead. He was also influenced by Aztec art, the Mexico-American Wars, and the works of Jose Posada.

The cards are then creatively named to reflect characters although the usual card characters – spade, hearts, clubs, and diamonds – are still used. The card characters include El Padre, La Hermana, El Soldado, El Catrin, La Viuda, El Bandito, El Caudillo, La Bailarina, El Campesino, El Azteca, La Catrina, and El Caballero. The Joker cards have the Muertos insignia and the sugar skull (i.e., Calaveras).

Author Details
Editor-In-Chief
A native Angeleno. John studied engineering at UCLA; founded Schmoozd, an offline social tech networking event in LA with 30,000 subs; ran a startup accelerator (StartEngine). Worked for several major brands like Toyota, DIRECTV, Hitachi, and Raytheon. A mentor at LMU Entrepreneur School. And advises a dozen local LA startups building amazing tech in various industries; also invested in some.

john@lastartups.com
×
Editor-In-Chief
A native Angeleno. John studied engineering at UCLA; founded Schmoozd, an offline social tech networking event in LA with 30,000 subs; ran a startup accelerator (StartEngine). Worked for several major brands like Toyota, DIRECTV, Hitachi, and Raytheon. A mentor at LMU Entrepreneur School. And advises a dozen local LA startups building amazing tech in various industries; also invested in some.

john@lastartups.com