5 Things NOT to Say to a Recruiter 0

5 Things NOT to Say to a Recruiter

The nice thing about a great employment rate in the country is that there’s a greater demand for your services and skills. That may lead to a competing offer from a recruiter trying to lure you to work at another company instead.

However, some workers forget the cardinal rule of always trying to look your best when you’re at a job interview. If you’ve been approached by a recruiter, you can’t regard them as merely the middlemen between you and your future employer. You have to regard them as another part of the hiring process, and you cannot underestimate the recruiter’s role on whether you get a more attractive offer or not.

This means you need to watch your mouth when you’re interacting with the recruiter, as the wrong words can botch the whole thing up. Here are some statements that you should never ever utter during that conversation with a recruiter:

  1. “I know the interview is supposed to be today, but can we reschedule this?”

    This is a cardinal sin. It shows a marked lack of respect for your recruiter and their job offer when you cancel an interview on the day it’s supposed to be held. The only reason this is even remotely acceptable is if there has been a sudden family emergency or death. However, if you’re running late, call or send an email with an explanation. In general, you need to be respectful.

  2. “I’m open to any job available in your company.”

    Job interviews are like first dates, and in both cases, you don’t want to come across as desperate. This statement is and for your image for several reasons. It implies some sort of inadequacy on your part, and you’re selling yourself short. The statement also makes it look like you haven’t thought things through regarding the move to the new company and your career goals. You also tell the recruiter that you’re willing to settle, and that’s an attitude that won’t get you the best offer.

  3. “Wow, that’s a great salary!”

    The rule in salary negotiation is that you never bite at the first offer. It doesn’t matter if that offer is already larger than what you were expecting to get in the end. You should do your research, and then make your salary pitch based on your research and the offers you get. A good salary negotiation is not accepting the company’s offer. They should be saying “yes” to your salary demands.

  4. “My previous (or current) company is terrible.”

    This is a huge mistake. You simply can’t complain about your former company, boss, or colleagues. Trash-talking only ends up making you look bad. Instead of complaining about the work circumstances, focus on how you dealt with the challenges that you faced.

  5. “My boss felt threatened by me, which is why they won’t give me a good recommendation.”

    Again, it doesn’t matter if this is true or not. If you give them a list of recommendations and your boss isn’t on the list, the recruiter will probably not comment on the absence anyway. If the recruiter does ask why your boss isn’t on that list, you can reply that your list of recommendations offers the most comprehensive view of why you’re the best person for the job.

Any snarky comments made to the recruiter should also be avoided, even if you’re annoyed that it took a while for the recruiter to respond to your job application. You may not be the only applicant, and the recruiter may be dealing with a busy schedule as well. Again, treat it like a first date—always be respectful and make yourself look good!  

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Santa Monica, Culver City, Venice, Hollywood, and beyond
LAStartups.com is a digital lifestyle publication that covers the culture of startups and technology companies in Los Angeles. It is the go-to site for people who want to keep up with what matters in Los Angeles’ tech and startups from those who know the city best.
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Santa Monica, Culver City, Venice, Hollywood, and beyond
LAStartups.com is a digital lifestyle publication that covers the culture of startups and technology companies in Los Angeles. It is the go-to site for people who want to keep up with what matters in Los Angeles’ tech and startups from those who know the city best.

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Top 10 Recruiting Firms in Los Angeles 0

Top 10 Recruiting Firms in Los Angeles

Think about the last time you were looking for a job. It was probably stressful and you spent countless hours scouring through pages and pages for job listings, only to find it either filled or you do not qualify for it.

Fortunately, there are ways to make the process smoother: a recruiter! And, the best way to find the right recruiter for your needs is either through referral or networking. But, recruiting agencies aren’t one-size-fits-all, start by researching the industries in which the agency specializes. Once you’ve found the agency that fits your industry, location, and level, reach out to them. A good recruiter is very active on LinkedIn and has their profiles well-developed. That means you should take the time to research who you’re dealing with.

Los Angeles has some of the very best recruiters in town; many were referred to us through networking. Here’s a list of the top recruiting firms in Los Angeles to make it a little easier on you.

  1. Neohire South, founded by Josh Stomel in 2007, a boutique recruiting firm focusing on early-stage tech startups.  Neohire applies years of industry experience to assess and curate its talent pool – connecting only top-notch tech candidates with the most exciting startups in the industry. Whether you’re building your team or searching for a job you love, Neohire should be your first stop.
  2. PeopleWare Staffing, founded in 1993 by Sheryl Rooker and her husband; a leading contract and full-time placement agency specializing in the technology industry.  For two decades, PeopleWare has provided outstanding service to employers and job seekers around El Segundo, and beyond. Through its unique H²R (High-Hit Recruiting) process, they have achieved among the highest ratios of candidates presented-to-hired in the technology staffing industry. Successful recruiting requires experience, knowledge, training, ethics, and specific skills. PeopleWare employs all of these traits in its H²R process.
  3. Putnam Recruiting, El Segundo based recruiting firm founded by Wes Putnam in 2009. Putnam Recruiting specializes in full-time and project-based recruiting for professionals in the tech space. Its extensive network, proprietary candidate database, and thorough screening process ensure their clients are being presented with the best talent in the market. Putnam Recruiting work with over 100 reputable companies, the majority of which are based in Southern California.
  4. Safire Partners is a tech executive search firm founded by Todd Gitlin in Southern California with a rapidly expanding national footprint. Safire Partners work primarily with emerging growth companies; ranges from disruptive venture-backed companies to multi-billion dollar public enterprises.
  5. The Workshop LA is a full-service fashion recruiting agency based in Venice, California founded in 2015. Its’ client roster consists of cutting-edge, Los Angeles based fashion companies ranging from start-ups to some of the biggest in the business. Audrey Okulick is the founder and owner of The Workshop LA.  She started the agency in 2015 after working for 10+ years in the fashion industry both in New York and Los Angeles.  She is the girl who had a million jobs when she was first starting out and understands first-hand how challenging it can be to find a career fit.
  6. Irvine Technology Corporation (ITC) is an award-winning Information Technology Solutions and Staffing provider with roots in Southern California. ITC’s team is comprised of seasoned technologists, staffing industry thought leaders, top-notch recruiters, dedicated account executives, and a world-class support staff.
  7. CyberCoders is a leading permanent placement recruiting firm. Through its innovative technology and efficient recruiters, CyberCoders helps find the right candidate fast. There is over 11,000+ job listing on its website.
  8. Cadre is a leading recruiting firm founded by Jason Stomel in 2009; specializing in tech startups in Santa Monica. Cadre focuses primarily on technical roles including software engineering, software development, and product design.
  9. Prosum is one of the fasted growing IT consulting and information technology solutions companies in the Los Angeles area. Prosum provides business solutions for technology consulting and IT staffing.
  10. Signal Partners is a search firm founded by Tim Smith; a purpose-built firm ready to help companies find and attract force-multiplying talent at all levels. Signal Partners has led hundreds of retained searches for PE- and venture-backed companies and drive a bespoke process for both executive and mission-critical non-executive positions. Some of the cool companies Signal Partners works with were SnapChat, GitHub, Yext, Houzz, Tinder, Tastemade, and many others.

Author Details
Editor-In-Chief
A native Angeleno. John studied engineering at UCLA; founded Schmoozd, an offline social tech networking event in LA with 30,000 subs; ran a startup accelerator (StartEngine). Worked for several major brands like Toyota, DIRECTV, Hitachi, and Raytheon. A mentor at LMU Entrepreneur School. And advises a dozen of local LA startups building amazing tech in various industries; also invested in some.
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Editor-In-Chief
A native Angeleno. John studied engineering at UCLA; founded Schmoozd, an offline social tech networking event in LA with 30,000 subs; ran a startup accelerator (StartEngine). Worked for several major brands like Toyota, DIRECTV, Hitachi, and Raytheon. A mentor at LMU Entrepreneur School. And advises a dozen of local LA startups building amazing tech in various industries; also invested in some.

Mariel Devesa Joins Tech Startup Phyn 0

Last month, I had the opportunity to sit down with Mariel Devesa, who had just joined tech startup Phyn as Global Head of Business Development. In the first half of our interview, we covered the basics:

Where was she born? Argentina (she moved to the United States at age one).
Where did she go to school? She has a bachelor’s degree from UCLA.
What positions did she hold before starting work at Phyn? Mariel was a competitive athlete as a windsurfer, worked at companies like Deloitte & Touche, Redbull, and Herbalife, and was working at Farmers Insurance as Head of Innovation before moving to Phyn this summer.

It was this last question that really caught my attention. How does one go from working as a sponsored athlete to being Global Head of Business Development at a Los Angeles County tech startup, and what skills and lessons did she bring with her along the way?

An Introduction to Phyn

Mariel explained that one of the things that attracted her to Phyn was how advanced their technology is. Phyn is a Torrance startup focusing on smart water management technology.

The Phyn Plus, Phyn’s first product, aims to enable to customers to “speak the language of water” by providing technology that monitors the water use in their homes or commercial buildings. To learn the basics of Phyn’s background, read our article on their technology here.

Working at a Startup

Mariel has an entrepreneurial background, her family having roots in real estate. To Mariel, working at a startup provides a higher level of agility in her work. She explained, “If you need something done, you just get it done.”

Phyn still has fewer than 50 employees, allowing her to work very closely with the product team. As Mariel put it, “Product is my next door neighbor, finance is my other next door neighbor, and [our desks are] six inches apart.”

The Makings of a Self-Starter

During her late teen years, Mariel’s involvement in competitive windsurfing resulted in a turning point for her confidence. She needed a way to finance her sports career, compelling her to network with companies (local and global) in order to source sponsorships. These endeavors were ultimately successful, as she put together multi-year sponsorships with companies like Redbull.

This wasn’t an easy feat, though. Mariel recounted her experience with shyness and rejection, “It was like a game for me. I’d walk into a room and say: I’m going to get this person to say yes. Even though 50 people are going to say no, that 51st person is going to say yes.” Books acted as a source of motivation for the young businesswoman, specifically, Harvey Mackay’s works, Swim with the Sharks Without Being Eaten Alive and Beware the Naked Man Who Offers You His Shirt.

Mariel’s curiosity and drive are key to her work, as she has switched industries and business departments multiple times throughout her career. Facebook COO, Sheryl Sandberg, refers to modern careers as “not a ladder,” but “a jungle gym.” Sandberg describes this as people who “look for opportunities, look for growth, look for impact, look for mission. Move sideways, move down, move on, move off. Build [their] skills, not [their] resume. Evaluate what [they] can do, not the title they’re going to give you. Do real work.” Devesa is a model example of this metaphor.

Actions at Phyn

It has now been just over a month since Mariel started work at Phyn, and you can be sure that the LA Startups team will be keeping up with the actions she is taking to maximize Phyn’s international growth through consumer education and global partnerships.

For more information on Mariel Devesa, you can visit her page on LinkedIn here.

Author Details
Managing Editor
Saphira has a combined social following of 150,000+ followers; experience in digital marketing, brand development, and business consulting. She is all about learning: reading 50 books a year, independently learning languages and computer programming. Completing her degree at Loyola Marymount University’s Hilton School of Business.
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Managing Editor
Saphira has a combined social following of 150,000+ followers; experience in digital marketing, brand development, and business consulting. She is all about learning: reading 50 books a year, independently learning languages and computer programming. Completing her degree at Loyola Marymount University’s Hilton School of Business.
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7 Ways to Prove Local SEO ROI for Your Business 0

7 Tips to Prove Local SEO ROI for Your Business

Local SEO is how local businesses can reach their prospective customers. Like traditional SEO, it involves a series of calculated steps to improve ranking in the search engines. A number one ranking is where you will get the biggest return on your investment, but number 1 rankings cannot be guaranteed and will certainly not happen overnight.

That’s why I want to show you a few things you can look at to see how well your local SEO efforts are performing. It can get discouraging if you don’t see ranking improvements, but that doesn’t mean the work being done is for nothing.

1. Track Ranking on Search Engines

Watch for changes in ranking for any of the keywords you are targeting. If you see a major change in rank, you know you’re getting a decent return on your investment. Take screenshots to show the changes in ranking so it is easier to demonstrate ROI to investors.

Ranking changes will likely increase slowly over time, but progress is being made. If you can increase your ranking quickly, this is wonderful, but will only make a difference in the long run if you can sustain the higher rank.

2. Track Calls from Leads

Using call tracking software, you can have your leads call a different phone number based on where they are coming to your website from. Your tracking system will connect with analytics and count it as a conversion. And attribute it back to the source.

Though this could be helpful, it’s important to display a consistent business phone number across the web because not doing so can affect your ranking negatively. Code your business phone number into your site using schema and monitor your local citations to make sure you’re talking numbers are not being picked up elsewhere.

If you notice calls are picking up, you know your efforts are working. If calls from a certain number are doing better than others, then you know that’s where you want to focus more of your efforts and budget.

3. Make Google Search Console Your Best Friend

  • Pay attention to Click-Through Rate (CTR): You’ll be able to tell if you’re getting more clicks on your targeted keywords than you use to. This matters because it lets you know that your traffic is clicking through you your website. If you’re not seeing improvement, rewrite the title tags on your site.
  • Keep an eye on search queries: Monitor the search queries that are bringing traffic to your website. Copy the data into a spreadsheet so you can watch for changes. Even if you don’t see a change in ranking yet, an uptick in traffic from certain phrases can show your SEO efforts are working.
  • For detail information about Google Search Console, head on over here.

4. Make Google Analytics Your Best Friend, Too

  • Track link interactions: Find out which links people are clicking on, and if they’re using the click to call button on their mobile devices. Set up event tracking in Google Analytics for more insights.
  • Find your most popular traffic sources: After people fill out a contact form, redirect them to a Thank you page. This way you can learn where your traffic is coming from, and you’ll know which methods are working so you can invest more of your resources on those.

5. Use the Google My Business Dashboard

You’ll be able to track impressions on your listings here, so you can see what kind of results you’re getting from the Map Pack. Since you can only go back 90 days, you’ll want to copy the data into a spreadsheet so you can watch for historical trends.

6. Use Year-Over-Year Comparisons if Necessary

If you’re in a seasonal business, comparing traffic on a month to month basis isn’t going to give you an accurate picture of what’s going on. Rely on the same month in the previous year to see how much you’ve grown.

7. Use These Simple Formulas for Calculating ROI

Anticipated ROI – What You Expect to Earn

To calculate this, you must know:

  • Average monthly visits – from Google Analytics
  • E-Commerce conversion rate – also from Google Analytics if you’ve set up Goals and Conversion tracking
  • Average order value (AOV) – Total amount of revenue divided by the total amount of orders

Let’s say your website gets an average of 60,000 visits and has a 1% e-commerce conversion rate. Your AOV is $100. Let’s say the proposed SEO project cost is $15,000. To break even, you must make at least $15,000 extra, and to generate a profit, you must produce a substantial amount of sales.

To determine the number of additional orders required for that breakeven point, you’d divide that $15,000 by the average order value of 100. You’d need 150 orders to break even.

Now, you need to determine the additional traffic required to generate those orders.

Take the number of orders required to break even and divide it by the e-commerce conversion rate. 150/1% = 15,000 additional traffic.

To deliver a decent ROI, you should double that traffic volume and aim to drive 30,000 visitors with the campaign.

At this point, we can expect to get 200 orders through the SEO efforts, which would result in $30,000 in sales – creating a 100% ROI meaning for X, you’ll earn 2X.

Actual ROI – What You Earned

Your actual ROI is the total e-commerce revenue through SEO + the total goal value through SEO – the cost of running the SEO campaign/cost of running the SEO campaign.

Let’s say you ran that $15,000 campaign and ended up with $35,000 in sales. You got a bit more than 100% ROI.

You can also use another formula:

  • K = volume of keywords searched
  • S = % of searchers who became visitors
  • D = % of visitors who became leads
  • C = % of leads who become customers
  • V = average customer value
  • L = Local SEO revenue

(K) x (S) x (C) x (V) = L

ROI = (L – Cost) / Cost

Let’s say 7,500 people search for “Carlsbad plumber” every month. Only a small percentage of these searches will end up on your site. The percentage, of course, depends on where you rank. If you are higher on the 1st page, you’ll end up with a larger portion of those visits.

So, let’s take a look at what you could expect if you were at the bottom of page one compared to what you could expect if you were in the number 1 position for that keyword phrase.

In position 10, you can expect to earn about 3% of the search traffic. Of that hypothetical 7,500, that’s 225 visitors. If you rank lower than that, you can expect even less traffic.

But, if you were in position one, you could expect to earn about 40% of the traffic for that keyword which means you would get 3,000 visitors. It’s clear that it pays more to rank higher.

To keep the math simple, let’s assume that 5% of visitors in both ranking positions become leads since the vast majority of people who visit your website won’t take the time to contact you at all. Now you’ve got 12 leads (rounding up) at position 10, and 150 leads at position 1.

We know that not every single lead will convert to a paying customer. Let’s assume that only 20% of those leads become paying customers. And position 10, you’d get 3 (rounding up) customers and in position one, you’d get 30.

If your average customer value is $200, you produced $600 in revenue in position 10 and $6,000 in position one.

If you’re spending a $750 a month in SEO services, and you’re left with $5,250 profit in the number one position and $150 loss in the number 10 position.

For every dollar you’re spending on SEO, you are earning $7 in return in the number one position. Though I’ve chosen completely arbitrary numbers, if you were in position 10 in this scenario, you would be losing money – 20 cents on every dollar – and therefore would need to increase your average customer value to make it worth it. If you spent less on your SEO, it would make it more difficult to increase your ranking quickly.

Knowing ROI is Important

Local SEO ROI can be found in many different ways. It’s important to look at the overall picture and focus on multiple metrics to see how well you’re doing. Choosing just one metric can skew your results.

Author Details
SEO virtuoso and CEO at Sachs Marketing Group. Always focused on being of service to business owners, to help better position them in the eyes of their audiences.
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SEO virtuoso and CEO at Sachs Marketing Group. Always focused on being of service to business owners, to help better position them in the eyes of their audiences.